Toddle About Blog

Parent Feeders: Are You Feeding Your Toddler Too Much?

Parent Feeders

Surveys show that more than 10% of parents usually serve their child close to an adult-size** portions

By Judy More, Paediatric Dietitian & Nutritionist specialising in children’s nutrition

Recent research reveals that some UK parents are overfeeding their 1-4 year olds with 1 in 10 parents giving their pre-schoolers near adult size portions. With the latest figures showing that one in five children are overweight or obese by the time they start school (1), practical advice is urgently needed.

Parents are Putting Too Much on the Plate

The research of 1000 UK mums and dads (2) revealed that 79%* of parents routinely offer portions bigger than the recommended size range for pre-schoolers when serving popular meals (such as spaghetti bolognese and chicken nuggets with chips), drinks and treats.  The survey, which involved parents looking at images of portion sizes, also showed that more than 10% of parents usually serve their child close to an adult-size** portion of spaghetti bolognese or cheese sandwiches. Continue reading

Practical Steps To Help With Your Fussy Eater

Guest Post by Dr Netali Levi, Chartered Clinical Psychologist

 

Fussy Eating

Mealtimes are supposed to be enjoyable, but with children who are ‘fussy eaters’ they can feel exhausting and frustrating for everyone.

“I don’t like that food, I’m not going to eat it!”

“Just try it.”

“No!!!”

How often does this exchange occur at mealtimes across the country? Mealtimes are supposed to be enjoyable, but with children who are ‘fussy eaters’ they can feel exhausting and frustrating for everyone. There’s no time like the present to work on these difficulties, so read on for some tips and ideas you can start putting into place today.

 

Find Out Why Your Child Is Being Fussy

There are many reasons why a child can be fussy about eating and the first step is to identify these. Spend a week monitoring your child’s eating patterns with a diary. Do they become hungry at particular times? Are they filling up on snacks in between meals, so are less hungry at mealtimes? Continue reading

Emotional Eating: 7 ways to help your child develop a healthy relationship with food

Written by Candida Hunt, founder of HENRY (Health, Exercise and Nutrition for the Really Young)

Love food not comfort food

There is a strong natural connection between food and love – but this emotional relationship with food can become unhelpful, particularly if we struggle a bit with our weight.

Giving our children a great start in life involves every aspect of what we provide for them. Here I’ll look at how two of these aspects interact: love, and food.

Nature has wisely made the act of feeding be part of the way we establish the emotional bond between mother and baby. Newborn creatures need to feed to survive, so it’s a good idea for mothers to enjoy it too. This link between food and love stays with us. When we start babies on solids, we’re delighted when they like the food we offer them, and can feel a bit rejected if they spit out the food (as they often do, to begin with) or throw it on the floor.

And it’s not only with little ones that this is true. If you have friends round for a meal, and nobody wants a second helping, there’s a moment’s dismay. If they don’t like my food, do they like me?

Emotional Eating

This emotional relationship with food can become unhelpful, particularly if we struggle a bit with our weight. Continue reading

Surviving the Early Morning Rush Hour

Written by Lorraine Thomas

The parent's morning battle field

The morning rush can be a battle field

A couple of days ago, one of my clients, Sarah, was in tears within moments of beginning our coaching session.

Sarah is a senior manager in one of the UK’s leading companies.  She’s responsible for a team of nearly 100 people and very successful at her job, working under pressure to very tight deadlines on a daily basis.

But it wasn’t this that had reduced her to tears .  It was her three and a half year old daughter, Katy.  She said that every morning – between 7.30 and 8.30am – she felt as though she was entering a war zone.

I asked her to tell me what she would ideally like to be happening in that hour, breaking down the time into 15 minute segments.  She was very clear.  She wanted Katy to get dressed without making a fuss and eat her breakfast instead of playing with it.  Most importantly, she wanted to have fun with her and the chance to chat and play before they both went their separate ways.

The reality was very different. Continue reading