Toddle About Blog

5 Reasons To Carry Your Baby

SleepynicoWritten by Angeline owner of sleepynico.com

We all have different needs but carrying your child is something we have to do so why not find a way that is comfortable and beneficial. Here are five fab tips!

1. Freedom: Being hands free allows you to do so many things. If you have other children you can hold their hands; carrying shopping, cooking or travelling are all easier with a happy baby in a sling.

2. Security: Being close feels safe. Your smell, temperature and heartbeat make your baby feel this way. Keeping them close is helping bring up a confident, happy child and gives them better health and mental stability in the future.

3. Style: For me, wearing something beautiful feels great and I was often stopped in the street and asked about my baby carrier. Choose a carrier that suits your style or character.

4. Sleep: Some babies do, lots don’t, not unless they are snugly in a sling. It’s the way I rocked my daughters to sleep nightly and how I could be sure that in a new place they would. Continue reading

Making Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths Fun!

Learning about STEMChildren are truly amazing. They are born with a will to learn, they are innately curious, they love to explore, to discover, to create and to understand the world around them. With no bias or boundary.

In their early years, it is therefore very important to provide our children with activities and opportunities to learn all about STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths). This early involvement will help to prepare them well for school and ultimately their future careers ahead.

Having fun with STEM activities both inside and outside may spark interests that you never knew your child had. Activities in STEM are a great way to develop thinking skills, problem-solving skills, investigation skills and encourage curiosity and creative thinking.

At Northampton High, we always use a variety of multi-sensory opportunities to promote STEM. From using light-boxes, growing food, building with a variety of materials and sorting and classifying objects there are always new ways to learn. Continue reading

How to Help Your Child Adjust to the Arrival of a New Baby

Smart Parent AdviceThe arrival of a new baby is an exciting time. However, for your older child, a new baby can be a dramatic life change. All of a sudden they aren’t the center of attention at all times. This new arrival seems to be mom and dad’s first priority, and doesn’t really do anything besides sleep, fill diapers and cry. It’s no surprise that this transition can be rocky.

Here are a few tips to help things go more smoothly.

Talk About The New Baby Ahead Of Time
It’s a good idea to start talking to your child about the new baby. While toddlers and young children may have trouble fully grasping the implications of a new sibling, at least it won’t be a complete surprise. It can help to point out different things around the house from time to time that the baby will use. For example, you might show your child a bassinet or crib and say this is where the the baby is going to sleep. Sometimes concrete examples like this can really help. Continue reading

Attachment Parenting: It Might Not Be What You Think It Is

Attachment ParentingAttachment Parenting is enveloped in confusion and opinion. It is often perceived as a fringe or extreme approach to parenting, though parents who practice it are simply following their instincts for attunement with their child. You may be practicing it yourself without even realising it.

A Brief History

Attachment Parenting International (API) was founded 25 years ago by Barbara Nicholson and Lysa Parker, in Nashville, Tennessee. They were mothers and teachers who noticed a growing need among students for greater family security and caregiver availability. They founded API to bring information and support to parents through a centralised collection of resources.

Today, the Attachment Parenting movement is well-established. Most parents recognise the power of touch, positive discipline and other Attachment Parenting practices. However, the essence of Attachment Parenting has been muddled. It is often confused with other parenting styles, such as permissive parenting (placing very few rules, expectations or demands on the child), helicopter parenting (like helicopters, parents ‘hover overhead’ to oversee every aspect of their child’s life) and natural parenting (centred on meeting the child’s needs and encouraging them to develop at their own pace). API approaches parenting in ways that can be adapted by any parent with the goal and desire of helping children reach their fullest individual potential. Continue reading

Is your Child an Orchid or a Dandelion?

The Orchid and The DandelionHave you ever asked yourself why some children’s lives are filled with satisfaction and happiness whilst others experience frustration and despair? Or why some children succeed and others struggle?

Following twenty-five years of revolutionary research, Dr Tom Boyce, one of the world’s foremost doctors in paediatric health reveals in his new book that children are either orchids or they’re dandelions. Some children (like orchids) are more sensitive and susceptible to their surroundings, while others (like dandelions) are more likely to be hardy and resilient, able to thrive easily regardless of the conditions around them.

Dr Boyce suggests that by better understanding more sensitive children and the adults they become, parents have the potential to make a positive lasting difference on their lives.

If you are wondering whether your child might be an orchid, take a look at these statements to see which resonate: 

  1. Your child finds it difficult to handle simple critique and disapproval, but generally responds positively to gentle correction.
  2. Your child seems to think of unusual solutions to problems that their siblings or peers would probably not have devised.
  3. Your child can have a physical pain-like reaction to non-physical activity, such as social conflict resulting in stomach ache.
  4. Your child feels things very strongly and is quick to display emotion.
  5. Your child is affected by changes in the physical environment, e.g. lighting, sound, temperature.

Continue reading

Review: Amawrap Baby Carrier/Sling, worth £39.99

AmawrapReview written by Toddle About VIP Club member, Zoe Calvey.

With not being a fan of dozens of clips and buckles, I love using wrap style slings and I am happy to say that the Amawrap did not disappoint.

Once you’ve had a bit of practice you soon get the hang of it and I can now tie it in under a minute! The Amwrap has a very helpful video to show you how it’s done as well as clear pictures in the instruction manual, it even shows you how to use the wrap in three carrying positions – hip, basic and newborn carry.

The sling is able to support newborns and children up to the weight of 15kg so I used this wrap with both my one year old son and my friend’s 3 month old baby.  The material is soft yet strong and it supported my 13kg son comfortably without causing me any discomfort.  It was really useful to have him in the hip carrying positions on days where he wanted to be held a lot – my hands were free to do other tasks! Continue reading

Naturally Nice: 10 Eco-conscious Childcare Products

Naturally NiceIf one of your New Year’s resolutions is being kinder to the planet by purchasing more eco-friendly products, you’ll need to work out how to include your kids in your quest.

To get you started, here are ten eco-conscious childcare products that perform perfectly and don’t cost the Earth.

1. Teddy bear

Named after US president Theodore ‘Teddy’ Roosevelt, the teddy bear has been comforting children for over a century — bag an organic bear from kids’ store Childrensalon. But be warned — it’s so soft and sumptuous that you might kidnap it for yourself!

2. Baby gym

With their hoops, mirrors and musical features, baby gyms keep rug rats entertained for hours on end — ethical site Babipur has a wide choice of natural wooden models that are built to last and look lovely. Plus, they’re so durable that they can be passed on from sibling to sibling. Continue reading

4 tips for busy mums who want to get an Education

Image credit: georgerudy / Adobe Stock

Image credit: georgerudy / Adobe Stock

You can have it all – romance, children, an education, a fantastic career and world travel. The catch? You can’t necessarily have it all at once – so you have to prioritise what’s most important in your life at any given time. There is no wrong answer to which of these wonderful things should come first and which can wait until later. If you’ve already made the choice to put your children ahead of a career and education, be aware that you’ve made a choice that works out well for many women.

But perhaps there’s a nagging little voice in your head telling you that you made a mistake – that you should have completed your education before you had children. Perhaps you’ve dreamed of returning to university to complete your education. Maybe you’re yearning for a career that will better provide for your children’s needs than your current situation allows.

Here’s the good news: You can make it happen! It will not be easy, but it’s rare for anything worthwhile to ever be easy. Countless other mums have returned to school to earn their degrees – and you can, too. Consider these 4 tips for busy mums who want to return to university: Continue reading

How to prepare your child for preschool

Wandsworth PreschoolGuest Post by Wandsworth Preschool.

It’s hard to think about your baby spreading their wings at such a young age and experiencing a world outside of the home, and it can be hard for a child to adjust to the change. There are a few steps you can take as a parent/carer that can make the transition less traumatic.

It’s important to make the preparation of preschool as fun as possible! Children shouldn’t feel that going to preschool is a chore, learning is enjoyable and its essential your child doesn’t feel that every trip is going to be educational.

Set some expectations of what your child can expect

The majority of children will feel anxious at the thought of starting preschool. You may feel tempted to address this by telling your child “school is always going to be fun, and you will enjoy every moment you are there” or “you don’t need to be scared everything will be fine,” try not to undermine your child’s anxiety and fears, instead give them information to of what they can expect, what they may be doing in class and who they might meet. Continue reading

More Than Just Fussy Eating

More than just fussy eatingWritten by Stephanie Elliot, the author of the young adults novel, Sad Perfect.

As a parent, you’ve most likely experienced some sort of picky eating in your child or children. Toddlers are known for – and prone to – refusing foods that don’t taste good, or look funny, or touch another food on their plate. Some kids are just naturally picky, refusing green vegetables or things that look weird to them. But when does it become more than just picky eating? When do you need to worry that maybe your child isn’t getting all the nutrients he needs?

My daughter was an extremely picky eater as a baby and toddler, and we were not initially concerned. We chalked it up to just that – picky eating. But, sandwiched in between two brothers who never refused any foods and excitedly ate lima beans and broccoli, we began to notice that our daughter’s aversion to many foods was becoming problematic. She would cry and scream, sitting at the dinner table, shaking her head back and forth, adamant that she would not be eating what the rest of the family ate. Her main diet as a young child consisted of very basic, plain and white foods, heavy on the carbs, very low on the protein and vegetables. She ate plain bagels and bread, Goldfish, French fries, pizza with the cheese and sauce scraped off, cereal, and waffles (but refused butter and syrup). She ate all sorts of sweets, and on occasion, I could coax her to have a peeled apple slice or a few raw carrots. Her only protein source was peanut butter and Carnation Instant milk. Does this diet sound familiar to you? Continue reading